The Kiso Road

the life and times of Shimazaki Tōson
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  • English
by
University of Hawaiʻi Press , Honolulu
Shimazaki, Tōson, -- 1872
StatementWilliam E. Naff ; edited by J. Thomas Rimer ; with a foreword by Janet A. Walker.
ContributionsRimer, J. Thomas., Walker, Janet A., 1942-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPL816.H55 Z7675 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24110590M
ISBN 139780824832186
LC Control Number2010008372

Wilson's lovely book describing what he sees along the Kiso Road reassures me that it is not all gone yet. There are a lot of books written by westerners who have lived in Japan a couple of years. Most are enjoyable, but only a few are extra special/5(30).

The Kiso Road, as approachable and exciting as any novel, with Toson himself as its complex protagonist, is arguably the most thorough account of any modern Japanese writer presently available in by: 2.

Walking the Kiso Road is a fascinating idea and the author introduces the ancient walking culture of Japan. There are no maps or pictures, however. The unique system of barriers and post towns is described in an excellent introduction/5. The Kiso Road, as approachable and exciting as any novel, with Toson himself as its complex protagonist, is arguably the most thorough account of any modern Japanese writer presently available The Kiso Road book Cited by: 2.

The Kiso road, an ancient trade route that is currently home to the modern Chuo railway line, is punctuated by 11 post towns that provide overnight lodgings and the opportunity to step “backward.

Take a trip to old Japan with William Scott Wilson as he travels the ancient Kiso Road, a legendary route that remains much the same today as it was hundreds of years ago. The Kisoji, which runs through the Kiso Valley in the Japanese Alps, has been in use since at least C.E.

A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan. Author: William Scott Wilson; Publisher: Shambhala Publications ISBN: Category: Travel Page: View: DOWNLOAD NOW» Take a trip to old Japan with William Scott Wilson as he travels the ancient Kiso Road, a legendary route that remains much the same today as it was hundreds of years ago.

A series of woodcut prints known as the 69 stations of the Kiso Kaido, based on the Nakasendo Road, line the bridge at Ena. A centuries-old rock inscribed with three Japanese characters (translated as “the Nakasendo path through the mountains”) marks the starting point for the walk, and with 10 other chatty trekkers we hit the path.

The trail between Magome and Tsumago is a well-maintained section of the former Nakasendo, the route that ran along the Kiso Valley and connected Tokyo with Kyoto during the Edo trail is relatively gentle and is well marked in English and is about 8 kilometers long and takes around hours to walk at a leisurely pace.

The Kiso Road Book Description: William E. Naff, the distinguished scholar of Japanese literature widely known and highly regarded for his eloquent translations of the writings of Shimazaki Toson (), spent the last years of his life writing a full-length biography of Toson. How to travel between the Kiso Valley and Takayama By train via Nagoya.

Take the JR Hida limited express from Takayama to Nagoya and transfer to the JR Shinano limited express from Nagoya into the Kiso Magome, get off at Nakatsugawa Station (4 hours, about yen one way).For Tsumago get off at Nagiso Station ( hours, about yen, not all limited express trains.

One of my favorite books on Japan is William Scott Wilson’s Walking the Kiso Road, published in I remember when the book was first presented to our sales team–being the Japanophile that I am–I thought, “If I ever go to Japan, I’m going to walk that road.”. ‎Take a trip to old Japan with William Scott Wilson as he travels the ancient Kiso Road, a legendary route that remains much the same today as it was hundreds of years ago.

The Kisoji, which runs through the Kiso Valley in the Japanese Alps, has been in use since at least C.E. In the seven.

For anyone looking for something between those extremes, the four-day Kiso Road tour is a slice of the more demanding day Nakasendo Way and an ideal introduction to off-the-beaten-path Japan. About Walking the Kiso Road Step back into old Japan in this fascinating travelogue of the famous Kiso Road, an ancient route used by samurai and warlords, which remains much the same today as it did hundreds of years ago.

Download The Kiso Road FB2

The Kiso Valley (木曽路, Kisoji) is located in Nagano Prefecture, and runs alongside the mountains of the Central ancient 70 km trade route called the Kisoji was developed along the valley and served as a very important means of commerce in the area.

Walking the Kiso Road A Modern-day Exploration of Old Japan (Book): Wilson, William Scott: "Step back into old Japan in this fascinating travelogue of the famous Kiso Road, an ancient route used by samurai and warlords, which remains much the same today as it did hundreds of years ago.

Travel with William Scott Wilson, esteemed translator of samurai philosophy, along Japan's famous Kiso Road. Walking the Kiso Road: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan William Scott Wilson Step back into old Japan in this fascinating travelogue of the famous Kiso Road, an ancient route used by samurai and warlords, which remains much the same today as it did hundreds of years ago.

It is the Kiso Road, an ancient trade route that meanders through mountains and forests for some sixty miles in the Kiso Valley of central Japan. Wilson has walked it a number of times. The hike he took inwhich is the basis for the book, was leisurely, with frequent stops at the small towns found every few miles.5/5.

“The Kiso Road,” Bill read aloud, “lies entirely in the mountains. In some places it cuts across the face of a precipice.

Details The Kiso Road PDF

In others it follows the banks of the Kiso River.”. In WALKING THE KISO ROAD: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan (Shambhala, paper, $), William Scott Wilson takes a stroll down one of Japan’s most storied thoroughfares, traversed since Author: Tom Zoellner.

This book combined two of my favorite things, hiking books and Japan. the Kiso valley is a fascinating part of Japan and transports the traveller back to a medieval time in japan when lords were required to send people regularly to Edo to ensure their allegiance of the shogun.

The Kiso Road, as approachable and exciting as any novel, with Toson himself as its complex protagonist, is arguably the most thorough account of any modern Japanese writer presently available in.

The old Japan is disappearing quickly. Wilson's lovely book describing what he sees along the Kiso Road reassures me that it is not all gone yet.

There are a lot of books written by westerners who have lived in Japan a couple of years. Most are enjoyable, but only a few are extra special/5(26).

The Nakasendo Way: The Kiso Road is a fully guided, Level 3 tour suitable for anyone who is an occasional walker and can walk for more than three to four hours in comfort. In general, the route is gently undulating but also includes some short, steeper climbs.4/5(4).

The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō (木曾街道六十九次, Kiso Kaidō Rokujūkyū-tsugi) or Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Road, is a series of ukiyo-e works created by Utagawa Hiroshige and Keisai are 71 total prints in the series (one for each of the 69 post stations and Nihonbashi; Nakatsugawa-juku has two prints).

Description The Kiso Road EPUB

The common name for the Kiso Kaidō is "Nakasendō. Read an Excerpt. From the introduction: "The Kiso Road--the Kisoji in Japanese--runs about sixty miles through central Nagano Prefecture and mostly follows first the Narai and then the Kiso River (traveling from north to south) through the granite forest-covered mountains of that same name.

It is the heart of the longer mile road, the Nakasendo (also called the Kisokaido), which stretches Brand: Shambhala. Wilson’s book is proof that his choice was correct. The poets and writers he invokes, and the people he meets as he travels, prove to be the perfect lens through which to view the Kiso Road.

Wilson's lovely book describing what he sees along the Kiso Road reassures me that it is not all gone yet. There are a lot of books written by westerners who have lived in Japan a couple of years. Most are enjoyable, but only a few are extra special/5.

The Nakasendo Way: The Kiso Road is a fully guided tour suitable for anyone who is an occasional walker and can walk for more than three to four hours in comfort. In general, the route is gently undulating but also includes some short, steeper climbs. Please read more on Tour Levels here.

Tour accommodation is in Japanese inns and hotels.2/5(1). Nakasendo and the Kiso Valley. The Nakasendo 'Road through the Central Mountains' was a key route in feudal Japan's network of highways. Merchants and Travellers moving between Tokyo and Kyoto spent multiple days to travel the Nakasendo, staying in Juku post towns on each evening.

BOOK NOW. Ask a question. Make this trip your own - one.The Road is a post-apocalyptic novel by American writer Cormac book details the journey of a father and his young son over a period of several months, across a landscape blasted by an unspecified cataclysm that has destroyed most of civilization and, in Author: Cormac McCarthy.Preface: “The Kiso Road—kisoji in Japanese1—runs about sixty miles through central Nagano Prefecture and mostly follows first the Narai and then the Kiso River (traveling from north to south) through the granite forest-covered mountains of that same name.

2 It is the heart of the longer mile road, the Nakasendo (also called the.